The mind vs. inner peace

Since before we developed writing, we have pursued ways to avoid the suffering of unpleasant feelings.

Each individual first notices that certain things distract from those feelings. So we become addicted to these distractions. Yet, eventually, we realize these addictions inevitably increase our unpleasant feelings. Our minds try to restrict our addictions and our suffering increases.

Then, we notice these unpleasant feelings are associated with certain thoughts. We notice ways to distract ourselves from these thoughts, and becomes addicted to them. We build our lives around these avoidance strategies and they become our master. Inevitably, these lifestyle strategies bring us more unpleasant feelings, or suffering, than we originally tried to avoid. Our minds try to restrict those parts of our lifestyle that cause our suffering, yet our suffering increases. We experience powerlessness.

Then, we try to find the source of the thoughts that cause unpleasant feelings, so as to stop them from arising. We seek in the spiritual teachings of other minds, the ways to remove these thoughts from our own minds. We become addicted to this search. We may, in this search, learn that giving up the control of our lives to an external master reduces our suffering, but doesn’t remove it completely. We may realize that we cannot control our mind, by the power of our mind. Regardless of the kind of spiritual practice we take on, we find some inner peace, yet suffering still persists.

We do all this, while knowing from childhood experience, that physically expressing our unpleasant feeling quickly ends the suffering of that moment. Yet, instead of allowing this natural process to occur, we live for our addictions and give up our self determination to external masters just to avoid that feeling of grief.

Then, only because everything our mind tried has failed, and we have totally run out of ideas, we finally allow the release of the emotion we were avoiding all our lives – only when all other strategies have failed and we have given up in desperation. We are instantly transformed and soon realize that our emotions, especially grief, alone have the power to rapidly repair our mind and its thinking – emotions are the immune system of our minds. As our minds are allowed to heal, we are gradually introduced to our inner master, and eventually, inevitably, no longer require any outer master of addiction, lifestyle or religion.

Then, we become our true selves.

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The mind vs. inner peace

Thought, beliefs, memories and feelings

Understanding the relationship between thoughts, beliefs, memories and feelings helps us to see how we are going in our healing.

At the surface, in our lives we notice feelings. It is our feelings that determine how we go about our lives. Too much negative feelings will hold us down and prevent us from progressing in our lives. Positive feelings will allow us to go for what we really want in life.

When we observe ourselves, we see that certain feelings are associated with certain thoughts. We can observe the associations, the patterns in our thinking. It can be hard to see how these thoughts begin. It is important to understand that it starts with our memory being triggered.

Things in our environment often remind us of a memory. Our mind is set up to work this way in order to understand the world, help us to avoid harm and allow us to find more good things. If that memory has a negative feeling associated with it, we will feel that feeling. Then the feeling can trigger other memories with that feeling, and we spiral into negativity. This is only possible if we have many memories with negative feelings attached to them. Alternatively, if we have a lot of positive memories, they can be triggered to spiral into positivity and empowerment – something we enjoy and often not want to change.

These memories are in turn, associated with beliefs, which are expectations of an experience being repeated. Beliefs are based on our observation of patterns of experiences, as well as things we have learned from others – such as things we are told as children by those we depend on. Having a belief that a negative experience will happen again will amplify the negative feeling, far above the actual feeling attached to the memory. No matter how big the feeling, it always has a negative memory at its core.

If we want to interrupt this process of spiraling negativity, we can remove the triggers of the negative memories, or we can remove the negative emotions from the memories. We can also correct the beliefs, the amplifiers of our memories. We can find a new environment where the negative memories are not so often triggered. This will make the problem occur less often. Trying to remind ourselves of positive things will only hold off the negative memories for a while. Its a short term solution that doesnt solve our problem.

The only long term fix for this issue is to remove the negative emotion from the triggered memories. Then, when these memories are triggered, they cannot cause us to feel negative. We remain positive and empowered. Correcting beliefs alone will not fix the core problem. It will make the negativity reaction we have much less, but it will still occur.

The natural mechanism for removing negative emotion from memories is crying. When we cry we are actually grieving the loss of some part of our selves, our life. The more negative experiences we have had, the more crying we need to do to heal it. When we cry, we also correct the beliefs associated with the memory, because once the emotion is removed from the memory, it becomes easy for the mind to correct the beliefs associated with the likelihood of it reoccurring.

There are so many methods to help us more quickly and easily identify and correct our beliefs, emotional memories, and generally dig things up to be healed. Yet most important of all is our inbuilt tool of crying, to remove emotion from memories, so that all of the mindset that rests upon that memory collapses. We benefit greatly from using methods we learn for healing ourselves emotionally, and they assist, and help our inbuilt tools of crying, dreaming and memory-revision. These methods can help us identify memories that are hard to uncover, and save us a huge amount of time.

Thought, beliefs, memories and feelings