Thought, beliefs, memories and feelings

Understanding the relationship between thoughts, beliefs, memories and feelings helps us to see how we are going in our healing.

At the surface, in our lives we notice feelings. It is our feelings that determine how we go about our lives. Too much negative feelings will hold us down and prevent us from progressing in our lives. Positive feelings will allow us to go for what we really want in life.

When we observe ourselves, we see that certain feelings are associated with certain thoughts. We can observe the associations, the patterns in our thinking. It can be hard to see how these thoughts begin. It is important to understand that it starts with our memory being triggered.

Things in our environment often remind us of a memory. Our mind is set up to work this way in order to understand the world, help us to avoid harm and allow us to find more good things. If that memory has a negative feeling associated with it, we will feel that feeling. Then the feeling can trigger other memories with that feeling, and we spiral into negativity. This is only possible if we have many memories with negative feelings attached to them. Alternatively, if we have a lot of positive memories, they can be triggered to spiral into positivity and empowerment – something we enjoy and often not want to change.

These memories are in turn, associated with beliefs, which are expectations of an experience being repeated. Beliefs are based on our observation of patterns of experiences, as well as things we have learned from others – such as things we are told as children by those we depend on. Having a belief that a negative experience will happen again will amplify the negative feeling, far above the actual feeling attached to the memory. No matter how big the feeling, it always has a negative memory at its core.

If we want to interrupt this process of spiraling negativity, we can remove the triggers of the negative memories, or we can remove the negative emotions from the memories. We can also correct the beliefs, the amplifiers of our memories. We can find a new environment where the negative memories are not so often triggered. This will make the problem occur less often. Trying to remind ourselves of positive things will only hold off the negative memories for a while. Its a short term solution that doesnt solve our problem.

The only long term fix for this issue is to remove the negative emotion from the triggered memories. Then, when these memories are triggered, they cannot cause us to feel negative. We remain positive and empowered. Correcting beliefs alone will not fix the core problem. It will make the negativity reaction we have much less, but it will still occur.

The natural mechanism for removing negative emotion from memories is crying. When we cry we are actually grieving the loss of some part of our selves, our life. The more negative experiences we have had, the more crying we need to do to heal it. When we cry, we also correct the beliefs associated with the memory, because once the emotion is removed from the memory, it becomes easy for the mind to correct the beliefs associated with the likelihood of it reoccurring.

There are so many methods to help us more quickly and easily identify and correct our beliefs, emotional memories, and generally dig things up to be healed. Yet most important of all is our inbuilt tool of crying, to remove emotion from memories, so that all of the mindset that rests upon that memory collapses. We benefit greatly from using methods we learn for healing ourselves emotionally, and they assist, and help our inbuilt tools of crying, dreaming and memory-revision. These methods can help us identify memories that are hard to uncover, and save us a huge amount of time.

Advertisements
Thought, beliefs, memories and feelings

Living by repressed strategies

When we look at the pattern of our lives, we can see that we use certain strategies to deal with the world. Each pattern has a strategy driving it. We may see patterns in our lives, and want to free ourselves from their limiting effect.

We develop these strategies based on childhood decisions and beliefs. Some of these strategies lead to success in our lives. These are not the ones that frustrate us. We are frustrated by the ones that limit our freedom and block our success.

One way for us to work out the strategy behind the pattern is to think it out, keeping in mind the childhood thinking that made it possible. Childhood thinking is forever-everywhere-thinking. As children we make decisions about how we are, and how the world is. We easily create beliefs that apply indefinitely.

More extreme limiting beliefs lead to more extreme strategies. For example, those of us who essentially live like hermits, spending most of our time alone, living in out of the way places, do so because of a strategy, not because of our personality. This strategy requires beliefs about safety being in places about other people. These beliefs require experiences that tell us all people bring danger. This example shows how to trace a pattern to a strategy to a belief. We will know by our emotional reaction,  if there is any truth to the connection.

Another pattern we may see ourselves sometimes live, is desperately seeking help, having a really strong emotional need for help, when difficulties come along in life. We then employ a strategy to get help in proportion to our emotional need for it. Yet it may be an excessive reaction. We probably don’t need as much help as we think we do. We are experiencing a memory of needing help. A memory of a more extreme experience, that led us to believe that difficult times put us in a position of being helpless.

These examples show strategies that are based on emotional memories of past events. They are simply too extreme. In order to have appropriate responses to the sitiation s we have in our adult lives, we need to remove the emotion from the belief. This then stops the strategy, because it is energised by the emotional memory.

The other approach to dealing with extreme strategies is to try to make them less extreme. With our minds we can decide what is logical, and apply our mental energy. This method takes a huge amount of effort, creates enormous struggle in our lives, and doesn’t actually work – because it is treating the symptoms rather than the cause. It is futile.

Better to dig up the emotion, clear the memory of its emotional baggage and limiting belief – and watch the limiting strategy disappear from our lives without further effort.

Living by repressed strategies

Memories of fear

At times, we may feel fear, when it either doesn’t make any sense at all, or it is unnecessarily strong. In these situation we are experiencing a memory of fear. This is a memory of a past event where we experienced fear, yet we have suppressed the memory and are only aware of the fear.

In response to traumatic experiences, our minds can use the technique of separating consciousness. This allows us to forget the experience and survive until we are safe. We are able to put things out of our mind, so that we can focus on protecting ourselves or getting to safety.

The mind takes enough consciousness to contain the emotion of the experience, and places it inside the memory, and files it away. This is the mechanism of intentional forgetting. The consciousness in that memory remains there, stuck at that time, but it is still connected to us.Also it still has access to our 6 physical senses*, and if it notices a situation that reminds it of the initial trauma, it will trigger the feeling in the memory. We will feel fear, yet not understand why.

The stronger the emotion held by the memory, the stronger the emotion felt in the present. Triggering extreme trauma can result in a panic attack. This is possible because consciousness is not actually divisible. We are separate emotions in the same way waves in water are separate. The same is true for our mind. Those forgotten memories cannot be completely separated.

These forgotten memories retain their emotion, often affecting our lives in negative ways. They remain this way until we retrieve and heal them. We can do this once we have found safety, yet our culture teaches us to never allow this healing.

To heal these memories, we need to allow the emotion when it arises. It may be as simple as grieving the emotion away. In some cases we don’t even remember the memory. Other times we need to use healing tools to trace the feel I to its memory. Some therapists have these skills, but most do not. Once we acquire these tools, we can use them ourselves. Whatever way we heal, grieving is required to clear the trapped emotion. We must allow ourselves to cry.

Therapists that are trained to help with PTSD from childhood or war trauma are more likely to know the tools required to clear emotion from intentionally forgotten beliefs.

The mechanism of forgetting, and later healing, is quite simple and easy to understand. Not so easy to do. Its really worth the effort! Initially, emotion released can be overwhelming, but it passes each time, and decreases as healing progresses.

* as well as the 5 physical senses we learn about, there is a sixth. We are a receiver and transmitter of electromagnetic energy and possess a complex energy field. We can send and receive a lot of information with this tool. Also, there is our connection with universal consciousness, that can be interpreted as a non physical sense.

Memories of fear

Depression and despair

Depression and despair are easy to understand. It is a memory of a feeling that you had when something bad happened to you.

Your mind is trying to heal you by releasing the negative energy. Allow it, by releasing the grief or anger or fear.

Then you can relive the memory of the experience that made you sad, and can put that memory in its proper place – your past.

You can use guided meditations or other methods to help you return to the painful memory in a safe way, and release the emotion attached to the memory. Then, that painful experience will no longer hold you back in life. You will be free of that chain.

Depression and despair